Homeowners Insurance

Your home is more than a structure — it’s a place where you create lifetime memories with the people who matter most. It’s essential to protect it and everything inside of it that you value.

Why Homeowners Insurance?

Your home is vulnerable to many risks — from destructive storms, liability from injuries, vandalism and more. Homeowners coverage is critical to protect you and your home from the financial consequences of a devastating loss.

If you are financing your home, your lender will require that you obtain adequate insurance coverage to protect the investment.

Even if you own your home outright, homeowners coverage provides the financial security to help you sleep soundly!

What's Included In Homeowners Insurance?

Full Coverage Details

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers the physical structure or dwelling if it is damaged or destroyed by a covered “general peril” which typically includes theft, fire, lightning, windstorm, snow, hail, rain, vandalism, malicious mischief and damage by a vehicle or aircraft. (Your policy will have a specific list of perils that apply to or are excluded from your coverage.)

The recommended amount of coverage should equal the current cost to rebuild your home in your area. However, land value should not be included.

Detached structures such as swimming pools, driveways, fences and sheds and not included in your dwelling coverage. (See the “Other Structures” section.)

This part of your homeowner’s policy includes the covered structures that are not attached to the dwelling if they are damaged or destroyed by a “general peril” covered by the dwelling portion of the policy. Detached structures such as swimming pools, driveways, fences and sheds and not included in your dwelling coverage. (However, Florida does consider a pool to be part of the dwelling.)

In most states, the recommended total amount of coverage for other structures is 10% of the dwelling coverage. (Florida coverage is typically 2%.)

This part of your homeowner’s policy protects your personal belongings such as appliances, furniture, electronics, silver and china, books, artwork, clothing, lawn and garden equipment, toys and many other items. These items are protected from damage or loss from the same “covered perils” as your dwelling.

Typically, the recommended total personal property coverage amount is 50% to 75% of your dwelling coverage.

It’s important that your policy has a “replacement cost” endorsement, so your belongings are covered at the full replacement cost and not their current value, which may be less.

Some personal belongings, such as jewelry, will need to be listed separately, or “scheduled” on your policy. Some of these items also may have replacement limits. However, you can purchase additional “jewelry and valuables” insurance for these items to fully protect them.

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers living expenses if your home is uninhabitable because of damage by a covered peril such as a fire or storm. This may also include living expenses if you must leave your home because of a government-mandated evacuation for a covered peril.

Reimbursable expenses include alternative housing and increased meal and laundry costs. The coverage amount ranges from 10% to 30% of your dwelling coverage or it may be a maximum time needed to make your home habitable.

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers liability claims against you that are the result of injury or negligence that takes place on or off the insured property. The maximum amount of coverage for these types of claims is included on your policy. In addition to this coverage, many homeowners purchase a personal “umbrella policy” to provide extra protection. Umbrella policy premiums can be as low as $150 annually for $1 million in coverage.

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers medical expenses for visitors or guests who are injured in an accident on your property. This does not include family members who live with you.

The maximum amount of coverage for these expenses is included in your policy. Additional coverage may be available for an additional premium.

The deductible is the amount you pay toward a settled claim. When your insurance company writes a check for the claim, it is decreased by the deductible amount shown on your policy.

Deductibles can be increased, resulting in a premium savings; or lowered, resulting in an additional premium charge.

Deductibles may be different for certain perils depending on the location of your property. For example, in coastal locations where windstorm is a threat, the windstorm deductible may be higher than the deductible for other covered perils. This can also apply to hurricane, tornado and earthquake perils in some states.

Everything you need to know about your deductible will be spelled out in your policy declaration. Be sure to read it!

There are additional endorsements or policies available for perils not covered on standard homeowners policies. If you have a risk you are unsure about, ask us! Here are some examples where we can help:

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers the physical structure or dwelling if it is damaged or destroyed by a covered “general peril” which typically includes theft, fire, lightning, windstorm, snow, hail, rain, vandalism, malicious mischief and damage by a vehicle or aircraft. (Your policy will have a specific list of perils that apply to or are excluded from your coverage.)

The recommended amount of coverage should equal the current cost to rebuild your home in your area. However, land value should not be included.

Detached structures such as swimming pools, driveways, fences and sheds and not included in your dwelling coverage. (See the “Other Structures” section.)

This part of your homeowner’s policy includes the covered structures that are not attached to the dwelling if they are damaged or destroyed by a “general peril” covered by the dwelling portion of the policy. Detached structures such as swimming pools, driveways, fences and sheds and not included in your dwelling coverage. (However, Florida does consider a pool to be part of the dwelling.)

In most states, the recommended total amount of coverage for other structures is 10% of the dwelling coverage. (Florida coverage is typically 2%.)

This part of your homeowner’s policy protects your personal belongings such as appliances, furniture, electronics, silver and china, books, artwork, clothing, lawn and garden equipment, toys and many other items. These items are protected from damage or loss from the same “covered perils” as your dwelling.

Typically, the recommended total personal property coverage amount is 50% to 75% of your dwelling coverage.

It’s important that your policy has a “replacement cost” endorsement, so your belongings are covered at the full replacement cost and not their current value, which may be less.

Some personal belongings, such as jewelry, will need to be listed separately, or “scheduled” on your policy. Some of these items also may have replacement limits. However, you can purchase additional “jewelry and valuables” insurance for these items to fully protect them.

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers living expenses if your home is uninhabitable because of damage by a covered peril such as a fire or storm. This may also include living expenses if you must leave your home because of a government-mandated evacuation for a covered peril.

Reimbursable expenses include alternative housing and increased meal and laundry costs. The coverage amount ranges from 10% to 30% of your dwelling coverage or it may be a maximum time needed to make your home habitable.

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers liability claims against you that are the result of injury or negligence that takes place on or off the insured property. The maximum amount of coverage for these types of claims is included on your policy. In addition to this coverage, many homeowners purchase a personal “umbrella policy” to provide extra protection. Umbrella policy premiums can be as low as $150 annually for $1 million in coverage.

This part of your homeowner’s policy covers medical expenses for visitors or guests who are injured in an accident on your property. This does not include family members who live with you.

The maximum amount of coverage for these expenses is included in your policy. Additional coverage may be available for an additional premium.

The deductible is the amount you pay toward a settled claim. When your insurance company writes a check for the claim, it is decreased by the deductible amount shown on your policy.

Deductibles can be increased, resulting in a premium savings; or lowered, resulting in an additional premium charge.

Deductibles may be different for certain perils depending on the location of your property. For example, in coastal locations where windstorm is a threat, the windstorm deductible may be higher than the deductible for other covered perils. This can also apply to hurricane, tornado and earthquake perils in some states.

Everything you need to know about your deductible will be spelled out in your policy declaration. Be sure to read it!

There are additional endorsements or policies available for perils not covered on standard homeowners policies. If you have a risk you are unsure about, ask us! Here are some examples where we can help:

Frequently Asked Questions

Insurance can be confusing. That’s why your Westwood agent and customer service team are so important. If you have a question – ask us!

Here are some of the most frequently-asked questions from our customers. The answers provide general information – each company defines their own specific coverage, terms, limitations and exclusions. Your policy includes the specifics.

What is covered on a homeowners policy?

A homeowners policy is a package type of policy, which includes protection for several types of possible losses called perils, including damage to your structure, your personal property, expenses for loss of the use of your home and liability or medical claims that may arise.

Why should I choose Westwood as my agent?

We do business with the top insurance companies in the country. Our highly-trained licensed agents will evaluate your situation and find the right policy and best insurance company for you. We provide the personal touch to be sure you get what you need, using technology to make it easy and efficient.

What is loss of use/additional living expenses?

This part of your homeowners policy pays for increased costs of temporary living arrangements after a covered peril occurs. This includes items such as hotel and food expenses beyond your normal expenses for these items.

What does personal liability cover?

This part of your homeowners policy protects you financially against claims resulting from bodily injury or property damage for which you may be legally liable. You are covered up to the liability limit stated in your policy for each occurrence. This excludes auto and business-related claims, as well as criminal activity.

What does medical payments cover?

This coverage pays for medical expenses of guests or others injured in your premises, up to the coverage limit.

How is the deductible applied?

The deductible is the co-insurance amount you pay toward a settled claim. The company will adjust and pay each claim for the full approved amount minus the deductible.

Can I keep my policy after I pay off my mortgage loan?

Yes. Please notify us immediately when you pay off your loan, so we can delete the lender from your policy.

What should I do if my mortgage company changes?

Call our customer service team and we will change your policy to reflect the new mortgage company. A common reason policies cancel is due to non-payment because the renewal invoice was sent to the incorrect lender.

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